News & Events

Shangri-La Institute's Summer inter Ellie Patey on her experience working with us

I have been lucky enough to spend the last four weeks living and working in Shangri-La, an area in the Diqing Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture that is rich in culture, wildlife and bio-diversity. During that time I have gained a unique insight into the projects of the SISC and the impact they have on education for sustainable development in local communities. While helping with existing SISC projects, I have also been working independently on designing, marketing and costing a research program, ‘The Shangri-La School’ for students to undertake here at the Napalinka centre in Shangri-La.

DSC_0052_low quality
Met with an open brief and a wide range of possible avenues down which to take the Shangri-La School, my first task was to decide upon the target market of the program and how best to reach them. I initially concluded that with my own international perspective, I would be best able to design a program for other overseas students. While I felt that my experiences at a university at the UK and knowledge of the summer programs frequently advertised was vital in designing and structuring my own research program, it was often challenging to communicate this to colleagues at SISC. Not only was the language barrier often a problem in conveying my ideas, but ideas themselves were sometimes questioned as they seemed inappropriate for the domestic audience that the colleagues were familiar with. Despite this, after sharing my own motives for coming to China and experience with programs in the UK, I was able to produce a convincing argument for creating a program for the international market.
While my knowledge of this market certainly did prove helpful in structuring the program, I also struggled with assessing what research projects would be most beneficial to the local area. Being in an unfamiliar environment, It took several weeks to obtain a good understanding of Shangri-La and the resources available here. Listening to the colleagues and visiting previous SISC projects, I was finally able to discern the vital role of wild-life and biodiversity in the area as well as seeing first-hand the impact of rapid urbanisation in Shangri-La. From this, I could determine the research that would be most valuable for students to conduct in a limited time period, given the abundance of resources available at the SISC.
In spite of this, I was still largely unfamiliar with the cost of several elements necessary to run the Shangri-La School, such as hiring an A-Yi (local lady to help with cooking and housework), a mini-bus and driver and maintenance costs of the Napalinka centre. This proved to be problematic when trying to calculate an accurate budget for the program, and more importantly, the cost for students. By thoroughly researching online, approaching local people and seeking help from the colleagues, I compiled a cost projection spreadsheet, making alterations over the duration of my stay. This also became easier over time as I had more confidence to communicate with local people, and felt more secure in asking questions.
Working independently on the Shangri-La School project has indubitably challenged me to work quickly and efficiently without specific deadlines. At times, it was difficult to come up with new and interesting ideas when working alone and to execute these without the time pressures of a fixed schedule. I found that by designating certain days to work in the office I could be productive without the distractions of being in the centre. Overall, I preferred the flexibility of working this way as it allowed me to explore the area and enjoy the best of the weather without losing focus on the task in hand.

“Young Citizens for Climate Change” project summary

This year, the German Embassy and SISC cooperated in the environmental education project “Young Citizens for Climate Change”, which was carried out in 15 primary and middle schools of 5 provinces from July 15 to December 31, 2015. The project promoted climate change education in the schools through teacher workshops, pilot school activities, experience exchanges and a closing seminar.

A task force of instructors designed a course of environmental education for the teacher’s workshop and developed the course materials. As part of preparation and networking, some teachers took part in a July climate change workshop hosted by Promotion for Civil Society, another NGO.

climate change2
Climate Change Education project

Beginning in early September, teacher’s workshops were held in Beijing (Sep 4), Sichuan (Sep 19), Guizhou (Sep 19), Yunnan (Sep 20) and Tibet (Oct 10). In each of the 5 regional teacher’s workshops, the leading instructor compiled a textbook with selected climate change information, taught according to local conditions, including historical and scientific background, as well as the status quo of climate change education today. They shared experience, exchanged ideas on case studies and worked out school activities. The instructor team and project coordinators then studied the pilot school activity plans and returned to the schools with feedbacks.

From the second half of September to December, the project was implemented as planned by all 15 pilot schools. The wide variety of activities included: Climate news reels, dramas and shows, as well as education on low-carbon emission, the environmental footprint, and adapting to climate change.

Beginning in December, all regions held closing meetings, summing up and sharing their experiences. The project was rated very successful and the teachers reported that our enthusiastic Young Citizens for Climate Change not only gained valuable experience, but also enjoyed the hands-on approach to environmental protection.

Students Push Back Against Rising Tide of Municipal Waste in Rural China

This post is reprinted from The Wilson Center‘s Environmental and Security Program, New Security Beat.

Baicao

Nestled in the mountains of western Sichuan Province sits the town of Piankou. Surrounded by three nature reserves that contain several hundred giant pandas, the landscape is undeniably beautiful. Rivers crash their way through rocky valleys framed by bamboo covered hills. But the scene was not always so tranquil.

Until a recent project by the Shangri-La Institute and Swarovski Waterschool, water channels running into the Baicao River passing through Piankou were frequently clogged with trash. “At that time, there was no garbage collection at all,” said Fu Zhiping, a professor of ecology at Mianying Normal University, during a recent visit. “It was a river of garbage up to here!” he explained as he pointed above his waist.

The Baicao is a tributary to the Yangtze River, China’s longest and perhaps most important river and the single largest source of pollution flowing into the Pacific Ocean. The Yangtze Basin produces 70 percent of the nation’s rice, 70 percent of its freshwater fish, 40 percent of the country’s GDP – and soaks up 60 percent of the country’s industrial pollution.

A symptom of consumerism outpacing municipal waste management, Piankou’s woes are not unique in China. While central government policies have focused on mitigating the nation’s urban waste problems, rural waste management continues to be overlooked. At the time of the Waterschool and Shangri-La program, no less than three different ministries mandated regulations and procedures on various types of waste management, but none had formal plans regarding rural waste.

Urban waste management has been the focus, while rural areas are overlooked
As a result, countryside communities were reliant on natural landfills, risking serious health, food, and water issues. The lack of rural infrastructure will continue to damage the vibrant and sensitive ecosystem of the Yangtze unless a comprehensive overhaul of rural waste management is achieved. But where national efforts have faltered, local grassroots projects have found some success.

In 2008, a devastating earthquake struck Sichuan, damaging many communities, including Piankou. The Shangri-La Institute, a Chinese environmental NGO that promotes sustainable development through education, collaborated with the Swarovski Waterschool, a water education and sanitation project network that works in thousands of schools around the world, to launch clean-up projects in more than 100 towns. The Shangri-La Institute hoped to aid in immediate recovery efforts. However in Piankou, they also noted the Baicao’s clogged waterways.

The two organizations found willing partners in local elementary school students who were eager to clean up the town’s foul smelling river. Students tested pollution levels and discovered the river’s water quality was poor enough to be unfit for direct human contact. Following this discovery, the program expanded, launching an environmental education campaign targeting waste management reform.

Access to consumer goods in rural areas of China has increased dramatically in the last few years, but trash collection is uncommon. Few rural governments have the funds necessary to set up robust waste management systems, and ignorance about waste management is widespread. Many people simply don’t understand that plastic packaging and containers are harmful to the environment and aren’t accustomed to putting their waste in designated containers.

Fu-ZhipingIn Piankou, students began a public education campaign with the support of the Waterschool and Shangri-La Institute. The community responded with earnest support. When polled by the schoolchildren, a large majority of locals believed the campaign to clean up the river and solve the town’s waste problems was necessary. The dissemination of information by the children was the foundation for a collaborative partnership with the community, and consequently, the foundation of the project’s longevity.

Eight years later, the program is still going strong. I visited this year to see its impact. As we strolled through Piankou guided by Fu Zhiping, the program’s local coordinator, we saw the channels running down to the Baicao River were largely garbage free. The children had accomplished an incredible amount.

The most important change was the design and implementation of a new township-wide garbage disposal system. Complete with a pick-up schedule, paid employees, and new strategically located trash cans, the system appears sustainable. The children’s enthusiasm and the effectiveness of the system led to funding from the town’s businesspeople to put in place and maintain the new system. The local government kicks in recycling bins and no-litter signage around the river. Fu explained that locals are also paid to regularly pick out trash from the river and monitor contaminants.

Clearly, there has been a major sea change here. What was once an apathetic community is now empowered, educated, and action oriented. Fu attributes the success to the Waterschool and Shangri-La project that helped bridge the gap between education, action, and tangible results. Students, he stressed, were the key to the transition we saw.

Inspired by Piankou’s grassroots success, other townships and villages along the Baicao River are using the same model to tackle environmental issues – a model that holistically unites multiple community roles for tangible change. Such an awakening among rural communities, and especially amongst young people, is crucial to turning back the wider tide of environmental degradation and loss of culture and traditions in rural China.

Lucy Binfield

Student Activists Push Back Against Rising Tide of Municipal Waste in Rural China

This post is reprinted from The Wilson Center‘s Environmental and Security Program, New Security Beat.

Baicao

Nestled in the mountains of western Sichuan Province sits the town of Piankou. Surrounded by three nature reserves that contain several hundred giant pandas, the landscape is undeniably beautiful. Rivers crash their way through rocky valleys framed by bamboo covered hills. But the scene was not always so tranquil.

Until a recent project by the Shangri-La Institute and Swarovski Waterschool, water channels running into the Baicao River passing through Piankou were frequently clogged with trash. “At that time, there was no garbage collection at all,” said Fu Zhiping, a professor of ecology at Mianying Normal University, during a recent visit. “It was a river of garbage up to here!” he explained as he pointed above his waist.

The Baicao is a tributary to the Yangtze River, China’s longest and perhaps most important river and the single largest source of pollution flowing into the Pacific Ocean. The Yangtze Basin produces 70 percent of the nation’s rice, 70 percent of its freshwater fish, 40 percent of the country’s GDP – and soaks up 60 percent of the country’s industrial pollution.

A symptom of consumerism outpacing municipal waste management, Piankou’s woes are not unique in China. While central government policies have focused on mitigating the nation’s urban waste problems, rural waste management continues to be overlooked. At the time of the Waterschool and Shangri-La program, no less than three different ministries mandated regulations and procedures on various types of waste management, but none had formal plans regarding rural waste.

Urban waste management has been the focus, while rural areas are overlooked
As a result, countryside communities were reliant on natural landfills, risking serious health, food, and water issues. The lack of rural infrastructure will continue to damage the vibrant and sensitive ecosystem of the Yangtze unless a comprehensive overhaul of rural waste management is achieved. But where national efforts have faltered, local grassroots projects have found some success.

In 2008, a devastating earthquake struck Sichuan, damaging many communities, including Piankou. The Shangri-La Institute, a Chinese environmental NGO that promotes sustainable development through education, collaborated with the Swarovski Waterschool, a water education and sanitation project network that works in thousands of schools around the world, to launch clean-up projects in more than 100 towns. The Shangri-La Institute hoped to aid in immediate recovery efforts. However in Piankou, they also noted the Baicao’s clogged waterways.

The two organizations found willing partners in local elementary school students who were eager to clean up the town’s foul smelling river. Students tested pollution levels and discovered the river’s water quality was poor enough to be unfit for direct human contact. Following this discovery, the program expanded, launching an environmental education campaign targeting waste management reform.

Access to consumer goods in rural areas of China has increased dramatically in the last few years, but trash collection is uncommon. Few rural governments have the funds necessary to set up robust waste management systems, and ignorance about waste management is widespread. Many people simply don’t understand that plastic packaging and containers are harmful to the environment and aren’t accustomed to putting their waste in designated containers.

Fu-ZhipingIn Piankou, students began a public education campaign with the support of the Waterschool and Shangri-La Institute. The community responded with earnest support. When polled by the schoolchildren, a large majority of locals believed the campaign to clean up the river and solve the town’s waste problems was necessary. The dissemination of information by the children was the foundation for a collaborative partnership with the community, and consequently, the foundation of the project’s longevity.

Eight years later, the program is still going strong. I visited this year to see its impact. As we strolled through Piankou guided by Fu Zhiping, the program’s local coordinator, we saw the channels running down to the Baicao River were largely garbage free. The children had accomplished an incredible amount.

The most important change was the design and implementation of a new township-wide garbage disposal system. Complete with a pick-up schedule, paid employees, and new strategically located trash cans, the system appears sustainable. The children’s enthusiasm and the effectiveness of the system led to funding from the town’s businesspeople to put in place and maintain the new system. The local government kicks in recycling bins and no-litter signage around the river. Fu explained that locals are also paid to regularly pick out trash from the river and monitor contaminants.

Clearly, there has been a major sea change here. What was once an apathetic community is now empowered, educated, and action oriented. Fu attributes the success to the Waterschool and Shangri-La project that helped bridge the gap between education, action, and tangible results. Students, he stressed, were the key to the transition we saw.

Inspired by Piankou’s grassroots success, other townships and villages along the Baicao River are using the same model to tackle environmental issues – a model that holistically unites multiple community roles for tangible change. Such an awakening among rural communities, and especially amongst young people, is crucial to turning back the wider tide of environmental degradation and loss of culture and traditions in rural China.

Lucy Binfield

The 2016 International Conference on Climate Change, Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services for the Sustainable Development Goals: Policy and Practice

In 2016, Wande Gomba, a representative from SISC and the Greater Shangri-La RCE, submitted a paper on Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) for the 2016 International Conference on Climate Change, Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services for the Sustainable Development Goals: Policy and Practice. For more information see here.

This conference, the fifth of its name, held the Sirindhorn International Environmental Park Cha-am, Phetchaburi, Thailand, saw speakers on various aspects of the Sustainable Development Goals. The event was also an opportunity to celebrate the birthday of the HRH Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn.

Wande Gomba submitted a paper for this Conference using the case of Bazhu Village on the Tibetan Plateau as a case study. ESD programs in the area have seen communities inspired and engaged to effect environmental changes, and empower themselves to enact sustainable development in the village.

Conferences like this one continue to validate The Shangri-La Institute’s message and allow for cooperation, dissemination of information and a greater understanding of how ESD can be used to empower communities.

The Shangri-La Institute attends the International Conference on Climate Change, Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services for the Sustainable Development Goals: Policy and Practice

In 2016, Wande Gomba, a representative from SISC and the Greater Shangri-La RCE, submitted a paper on Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) for The 2016 International Conference on Climate Change, Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services for the Sustainable Development Goals: Policy and Practice. For more information see here.

This conference, the fifth of its name, held the Sirindhorn International Environmental Park Cha-am, Phetchaburi, Thailand, saw speakers on various aspects of the Sustainable Development Goals. The event was also an opportunity to celebrate the birthday of the HRH Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn.

Wande Gomba submitted a paper for this Conference using the case of Bazhu Village on the Tibetan Plateau as a case study. ESD programs in the area have seen communities inspired and engaged to effect environmental changes, and empower themselves to enact sustainable development in the village.

Conferences like this one continue to validate The Shangri-La Institute’s message and allow for cooperation, dissemination of information and a greater understanding of how ESD can be used to empower communities.

中国道路交通安全教育项目

背景:
全世界每四分钟就有一名儿童在公路上死亡,数百名儿童受伤;每天有 2000 多个家庭因非故意伤害或“意外事故”而失去孩子,变得破碎;每年近130万人死于道路交通车祸,2000万至5000万人受伤。这些意外事故给儿童自身或家庭中的母亲、父亲、兄弟姐妹、祖父母以及朋友带来难以承受的悲痛。同时,这种意外事故的悲剧可能彻底改变了人们的生活。然而,这种悲剧本可以预防、甚至可以避免。
一些数据显示,道路交通安全伤害已成为15-29岁年龄人群的主要死亡原因;90%以上的道路交通死亡和伤害发生在低收入和中等收入国家;如果任由事态发展下去,到2030年,道路交通伤害将成为第五大死亡原因,而据2004年的数据,道路交通伤害在十大致死原因中排在第九位。
2010年3月2日,联合国大会通过决议,宣布2011年至2020年为道路安全行动十年。决议指出,行动十年的目标是通过在国家、区域和全球各级开展更多活动,稳定并降低全球道路死亡率。
作为联合国道路安全十年行动(2011-2020)的合作伙伴,国际汽联开展了“国际汽联道路交通安全行动项目”,并作为《十年行动》内容之一。

简介:

中国道路交通安全教育项目由国际汽车联合会发起,中国汽车摩托车运动联合会全力支持,香格里拉可持续社区学会目前在三个区域策划执行该项目。该项目是FIA道路交通安全行动的组成部分,是香格里拉可持续社区学会实践可持续教育的重要组成部分。

实施:
1、项目通过开展教师培训,提升教师开展道路交通安全教育所需的知识与技能;提升学校应对道路交通教育安全问题、降低安全风险的能力。
2、项目在学校开展必修课程、特设及日常活动,培养学生安全意识及道路交通安全行为习惯,鼓励学生发现和解决当地道路交通安全问题,吸引社区成员、家长乃至更广泛利益群体关注道路交通安全问题提升公众安全意识以降低交通事故伤害。

目标:

提升公众交通安全意识,为儿童及我们创造更加安全的出行环境

最新消息:
根据项目实施计划,已于2016年4月9-10日、13-14日、23-24日分别在香格里拉、武汉、重庆开展了2016年道路交通安全教育参与式培训会。(详情见Wechat)

2016 Road Safety Workshops a Huge Success

The 2016 Participatory workshop for Road Safety Education in China has been held in Shangri-La (April 9-10), Wuhan (April 13-14), Chongqing in(April 23-24) April 2016. These workshops promoted road safety in an interactive teacher training forum that will lead t students carrying out special and daily activities in the school develop students’ safety awareness and safety habits, encouraging students to identify and solve local road safety issues, and attract members of the community, parents and the wider groups to concern and enhance public safety awareness to reduce the rate of road injuries.
Every four minutes, a child dies in a car accident somewhere in the world; Every day, more than 2,000 families lose a precious child and become broken due to car-related injury; There are nearly 1.3 million people die from road traffic crashes and 20 million to 50 million are injured. These accidents bring unbearable grief to children themselves or their mother, father, siblings, grandparents and friends. This kind of tragedy could completely transform someone’s life in an instant. Despite the seriousness of these statistics, in many cases these tragedies are avoidable if at risk groups are given the right training.
Road traffic injuries are now said to be the leading cause of death in the 15-29 age group; Even more worrying, 90 percent of these road traffic deaths and injuries occur in low- and middle-income countries. If the current pattern continues, road traffic injuries will become the fifth leading cause of death in 2030, although road traffic injuries comes in ninth of the top ten death causes.
On March 2, 2010, the UN General Assembly adopted a resolution declaring 2011 to 2020 as the Decade of Action for Road Safety. Resolution states that the objectives of the Decade of Action are undertaking more activities nationally, regionally and globally to stabilize and reduce global road mortality.
As a partner of the United Nations Road Safety Action for the Decade (2011-2020) , the FIA has launched the “FIA road safety action program,” as a part of the “Decade of Action”.
China Road Safety Education Project launched by the Fédération Internationale de l’Automobile (FIA) and supported by China Automobile and Motor Sports Federation(CAMF). The Shangri-la Institute is currently executing this project I three areas. The project is part of the FIA Road Safety Action for Decades and represents an opportunity for the Shangri-la Institute to implement sustainable education.

SISC collaborates with the JUMP! Foundation

On Monday April 18th, 2016, The Shangri-La Institute for Sustainable Communities collaborated with The JUMP! Foundation (for information see their website here) and the Beijing Jintai Museum in Chaoyang Park for a social learning session based on water conservation.

The 9 students from Hangzhou and facilitators from The JUMP! Foundation and the SISC came together with SISC Vice- Director Philip Xie for the session, which saw the lines between educator and student blurred as the students took the stage one by one to explain their knowledge of various topics related to water conservation in China.

Have a look at some photos of the session below!

JUMP Foundation Event Screen Shot 2016-05-06 at 2.11.24 PM Screen Shot 2016-05-06 at 2.12.04 PM Screen Shot 2016-05-06 at 2.12.27 PM

We hope that this will be the first on many collaborations with the JUMP! Foundation.

The SISC are grateful to the Beijing Jintai museum for providing their space for this event. The Jintai museum is a fascinating space established by Yuan Xikun, a leading artist and sculptor, and the Museum has held hundreds of events since its opening in 1997.

中国道路交通安全教育项目

背景:
全世界每四分钟就有一名儿童在公路上死亡,数百名儿童受伤;每天有 2000 多个家庭因非故意伤害或“意外事故”而失去孩子,变得破碎;每年近130万人死于道路交通车祸,2000万至5000万人受伤。这些意外事故给儿童自身或家庭中的母亲、父亲、兄弟姐妹、祖父母以及朋友带来难以承受的悲痛。同时,这种意外事故的悲剧可能彻底改变了人们的生活。然而,这种悲剧本可以预防、甚至可以避免。
一些数据显示,道路交通安全伤害已成为15-29岁年龄人群的主要死亡原因;90%以上的道路交通死亡和伤害发生在低收入和中等收入国家;如果任由事态发展下去,到2030年,道路交通伤害将成为第五大死亡原因,而据2004年的数据,道路交通伤害在十大致死原因中排在第九位。
2010年3月2日,联合国大会通过决议,宣布2011年至2020年为道路安全行动十年。决议指出,行动十年的目标是通过在国家、区域和全球各级开展更多活动,稳定并降低全球道路死亡率。
作为联合国道路安全十年行动(2011-2020)的合作伙伴,国际汽联开展了“国际汽联道路交通安全行动项目”,并作为《十年行动》内容之一。

简介
中国道路交通安全教育项目由国际汽车联合会发起,中国汽车摩托车运动联合会全力支持,香格里拉可持续社区学会目前在三个区域策划执行该项目。该项目是FIA道路交通安全行动的组成部分,是香格里拉可持续社区学会实践可持续教育的重要组成部分。

实施:
1、项目通过开展教师培训,提升教师开展道路交通安全教育所需的知识与技能;提升学校应对道路交通教育安全问题、降低安全风险的能力。
2、项目在学校开展必修课程、特设及日常活动,培养学生安全意识及道路交通安全行为习惯,鼓励学生发现和解决当地道路交通安全问题,吸引社区成员、家长乃至更广泛利益群体关注道路交通安全问题提升公众安全意识以降低交通事故伤害。

目标:
提升公众交通安全意识,为儿童及我们创造更加安全的出行环境

最新消息:
根据项目实施计划,已于2016年4月9-10日、13-14日、23-24日分别在香格里拉、武汉、重庆开展了2016年道路交通安全教育参与式培训会。(详情见Wechat)

2016 Road Safety Workshops a Huge Success

The 2016 Participatory workshop for Road Safety Education in China has been held in the Shangri-La (April 9-10), Wuhan (April 13-14), Chongqing in(April 23-24) April 2016. These workshops promoted road safety in an interactive teacher training forum that will lead t students carrying out special and daily activities in the school develop students’ safety awareness and safety habits, encouraging students to identify and solve local road safety issues, and attract members of the community, parents and the wider groups to concern and enhance public safety awareness to reduce the rate of road injuries.
Every four minutes, a child dies in a car accident somewhere in the world; Every day, more than 2,000 families lose a precious child and become broken due to car-related injury; There are nearly 1.3 million people die from road traffic crashes and 20 million to 50 million are injured. These accidents bring unbearable grief to children themselves or their mother, father, siblings, grandparents and friends. This kind of tragedy could completely transform someone’s life in an instant. Despite the seriousness of these statistics, in many cases these tragedies are avoidable if at risk groups are given the right training.
Road traffic injuries are now said to be the leading cause of death in the 15-29 age group; Even more worrying, 90 percent of these road traffic deaths and injuries occur in low- and middle-income countries. If the current pattern continues, road traffic injuries will become the fifth leading cause of death in 2030, although road traffic injuries comes in ninth of the top ten death causes.
On March 2, 2010, the UN General Assembly adopted a resolution declaring 2011 to 2020 as the Decade of Action for Road Safety. Resolution states that the objectives of the Decade of Action are undertaking more activities nationally, regionally and globally to stabilize and reduce global road mortality.
As a partner of the United Nations Road Safety Action for the Decade (2011-2020) , the FIA has launched the “FIA road safety action program,” as a part of the “Decade of Action”.
China Road Safety Education Project launched by the Fédération Internationale de l’Automobile (FIA) and supported by China Automobile and Motor Sports Federation(CAMF). The Shangri-la Institute is currently executing this project I three areas. The project is part of the FIA Road Safety Action for Decades and represents an opportunity for the Shangri-la Institute to implement sustainable education.

2016 Road Safety Teacher Training Workshops a huge success

背景:
全世界每四分钟就有一名儿童在公路上死亡,数百名儿童受伤;每天有 2000 多个家庭因非故意伤害或“意外事故”而失去孩子,变得破碎;每年近130万人死于道路交通车祸,2000万至5000万人受伤。这些意外事故给儿童自身或家庭中的母亲、父亲、兄弟姐妹、祖父母以及朋友带来难以承受的悲痛。同时,这种意外事故的悲剧可能彻底改变了人们的生活。然而,这种悲剧本可以预防、甚至可以避免。
一些数据显示,道路交通安全伤害已成为15-29岁年龄人群的主要死亡原因;90%以上的道路交通死亡和伤害发生在低收入和中等收入国家;如果任由事态发展下去,到2030年,道路交通伤害将成为第五大死亡原因,而据2004年的数据,道路交通伤害在十大致死原因中排在第九位。
2010年3月2日,联合国大会通过决议,宣布2011年至2020年为道路安全行动十年。决议指出,行动十年的目标是通过在国家、区域和全球各级开展更多活动,稳定并降低全球道路死亡率。
作为联合国道路安全十年行动(2011-2020)的合作伙伴,国际汽联开展了“国际汽联道路交通安全行动项目”,并作为《十年行动》内容之一。

简介
中国道路交通安全教育项目由国际汽车联合会发起,中国汽车摩托车运动联合会全力支持,香格里拉可持续社区学会目前在三个区域策划执行该项目。该项目是FIA道路交通安全行动的组成部分,是香格里拉可持续社区学会实践可持续教育的重要组成部分。

实施:
1、项目通过开展教师培训,提升教师开展道路交通安全教育所需的知识与技能;提升学校应对道路交通教育安全问题、降低安全风险的能力。
2、项目在学校开展必修课程、特设及日常活动,培养学生安全意识及道路交通安全行为习惯,鼓励学生发现和解决当地道路交通安全问题,吸引社区成员、家长乃至更广泛利益群体关注道路交通安全问题提升公众安全意识以降低交通事故伤害。

目标:
提升公众交通安全意识,为儿童及我们创造更加安全的出行环境

最新消息:
根据项目实施计划,已于2016年4月9-10日、13-14日、23-24日分别在香格里拉、武汉、重庆开展了2016年道路交通安全教育参与式培训会。(详情见Wechat)

The SISC collaborates with the JUMP! Foundation on water conservation education

On Monday April 18th, 2016, The Shangri-La Institute for Sustainable Communities collaborated with The JUMP! Foundation (for information see their website here) and the Beijing Jintai Museum in Chaoyang Park for a social learning session based on water conservation.

The 9 students from Hangzhou and facilitators from The JUMP! Foundation and the SISC came together with SISC Vice- Director Philip Xie for the session, which saw the lines between educator and student blurred as the students took the stage one by one to explain their knowledge of various topics related to water conservation in China.

Have a look at some photos of the session below!

JUMP Foundation Event Screen Shot 2016-05-06 at 2.11.24 PM Screen Shot 2016-05-06 at 2.12.04 PM Screen Shot 2016-05-06 at 2.12.27 PM

We hope that this will be the first on many collaborations with the JUMP! Foundation.

The SISC are grateful to the Beijing Jintai museum for providing their space for this event. The Jintai museum is a fascinating space established by Yuan Xikun, a leading artist and sculptor, and the Museum has held hundreds of events since its opening in 1997.

Regional Meeting in Inner Mongolia

On December 5 the regional meeting of the project “Young Citizen’s Initiative for Climate Change” was held at Tumote School in Hohhot, Inner Mongolia.

Teachers of two project schools from Beijing, Guangqumen Middle School and Beijing No. 8 Middle School, shared their experiences with teachers from two local schools, Tumote School and Xinqiao Primary School, who introduced their planned climate education projects. Representatives from Inner Mongolia Normal University as well as experts from the People’s Education Press presented case studies of domestic and international climate change education, school activities and future plans for this project. SISC’s project coordinators also attended the meeting and took documented the fruitful discussions and suggestions.

"River of Life" workshop in Beijing concluded

SISC’s Blue Water project focuses on the South-North Water Diversion Project and how it affects the local communities. Over the last year, schools in Beijing and Xiangyang have successfully carried out several study tours and exchanges. Students and teachers have collected results of various water tests, conducted public polls in both regions, and kept the general public informed.

This year, aside from local efforts and joint learning activities with the Beijing Science and Technology Museum and to the Badaling Forest Experience Center, 28 Blue Water representatives from both regions attended the “River of Life” workshop in Beijing.

The participants shared and discussed their experiences and results while documenting the project’s progress. In order to protect the land and water and to observe the impact of the water transfer project, more excursions to Dangjiakou dam were scheduled to maintain and further improve our ongoing hands-on inquiry based learning experience about the impact of the South-North Water Diversion Project.

Living Yangtze by Eric Valli

 A multi-media exhibition sponsored by Swarovski Waterschool

On September 9, Eric Valli’s Living Yangtze multi-media exhibition, sponsored by Swarovski Waterschool, launched in Shanghai.  The distinguished French photographer, film director and author Eric Valli travelled over 6 months along the Yangtze River, documenting the lives of those who live alongside it. In his Living Yangtze Exhibition in Jingan Park, a series of stunning images and short films are being displayed around the park from September 9-27. In tandem with the photo and video exhibition, an interactive water education zone has been installed in the park to educate and engage children in learning about water.

"Living Yangtze started with a basic observation: as human beings we have a tendency to forget things we don’t like to hear about, but we remember what emotionally touches us for the rest of our lives. It was 2013 that I saw this incredible, beautiful lake not far from Wuhan, with bamboo sticking out of it." Quote and photo by Eric Valli.

“Living Yangtze started with a basic observation: as human beings we have a tendency to forget things we don’t like to hear about, but we remember what emotionally touches us for the rest of our lives. It was 2013 that I saw this incredible, beautiful lake not far from Wuhan, with bamboo sticking out of it.” Quote and photo by Eric Valli.

SISC has not only supported the journey and exhibition of Eric Valli, but also contributed to his new book Living Yangtze with a chapter written by Liu Yunhua, founder and director of SISC. Also, SISC has helped to plan and set up a booth at the venue to share water education with the visitors and their children.

Waterschool China at Jing'an Park

Check out film trailers below:

 Living Yangtze by Eric Valli Swarovski Waterschool Trailer (on Youtube)

Living Yangtze by Eric Valli for Swarovski Waterschool (on Youku)

 

International Swarovski Waterschool Coordinators Workshop

From June 27 to July 3, Shangri-la Institute Director Yunhua Liu attended the Third International Swarovski Waterschool Coordinators Workshop in Austria. Other attendees included representatives from Swarovski Waterschool projects around the world, including the Waterschools in Austria, India, China, Uganda, and Brazil.

Besides sharing their experiences implementing Waterschool programs around the world, SISC representatives organized interactive exercises with Swarovski staff, introducing staff and their families to water conservation activities and traditional water culture.

In addition, a family event was held at the Swarovski Crystal Worlds theme park. At the event, representatives from various Waterschools presented and explained their work and respective cultural heritage to interested visitors, offering fun activities and learning opportunities for all ages. At the Waterschool China stand, the introduction in calligraphy was especially popular.

RBC Blue Water Day Activities in Huizhou

On June 6, 2015, Huizhou No. 3 Middle School held the “Protect the Dong River” activity in honor of RBC Blue Water Day. Students set up exhibition boards and handed out flyers to local residents to help explain to their community the importance of protecting their mother river, the Dong River.

Middle school students hand out flyers to community members

Poster topics included “Water is a Precious Resource,” “The Remote Source of the Dong River,” “Protect our Dong River,” and  “Little Tips for Conserving Water at Home”.  In addition to these displays, students pasted reminders and tips for how to conserve water around their residential districts, and handed out flyers about water conservation and the Dong River.

Students and teachers from Huizhou No.3 Middle School celebrate RBC Blue Water day

Students and teachers from Huizhou No.3 Middle School celebrate RBC Blue Water day

NGS Youth Environmental Leadership Project

The Qinghai-Tibet plateau has many fragile ecosystems that are in need of protection. To address this issue, the NGS Youth Environmental Leadership Project has created a platform for young monks at Dongzhulin Monastery to see how their own activities can drive change and progress.

Dongzhulin Monastery is located on the upper reaches of the Jinsha River, on the border between Sichuan and Yunnan province, at an elevation of 3000 meters above sea level. The Jinsha River cuts through the high mountains, forming a sharp contrast with the hot and dry environment of the valley. The combination of intense sunshine, sparse rainfall, and steep hills leads to massive soil erosion and poses a serious problem. Protecting the plants and trees in the local forest has become an important component of the monk’s daily work, and the large pine forest outside the walls of Dongzhulin Monastery is a testament the monks’ many years of labor.

Left: A young monk from Dongzhulin Monastery planting a pine tree sapling with bare hands in a steep and arid slope.
Right: Monks showing the results of former efforts to explain the importance of forest protection to nearby communities. (Photos by Xiao Lin)

From 2014 to 2015, 30 young monks from ages 12-25 completed 10 environmental protection activities so far. Their goal is to develop and promote youth environmental leadership through student actions, driving community participation and further environmental protection efforts. The project is co-sponsored by the National Geographic Society and SISC, and receives financial support from Alibaba.

7th World Water Forum

SISC participates in the 7th World Water Forum:

Peihong Xie presenting on trans-boundary water resource management at the World Water Forum in Korea

From April 13-17th, staff members from the Shangri-la Institute attended the 7th World Water Forum in Daegu and Gyeongbuk, South Korea. In Gyongbuk, SISC participated in a panel addressing Transboundary Water Resource Management in Northeast Asia, engaging in a lively discussion with participants from Russia, Mongolia, and the United States. In Daegu, SISC Vice-Director Phillip Xie led a roundtable discussion on community education at a session on “Water and Capacity Building,” sharing experiences and ideas with a passionate and international group of community educators.